Apps Parents Should Know About

Whisper App

I’ve come across articles similar to this in the past few months (see below) and since I am not tech-savy I appreciate that there are those who are concerned for the safety of our children in this new age of social media . I do have a Facebook account, and Instagram and a Twitter account, but if I have anything to do with it, my children will have neither of them until they are in high school (and even beyond depending on how the tools of communication in our society change by then). Every day you see a news blur about an abducted child, or missing/exploited teenager and I believe it is much more prevalent today with Apps that not only allow unidentified strangers to contact our children but also track them by GPS and lure them into their adult world. I see how easily my own children can be obsessed with the games they play on their tablets and it’s clear to me that the more time they spend staring at their screens, the less time they spend reading a book, riding their bikes, being aware of their surroundings and having normal, healthy conversations and relationships with friends and family.

Call me old-school, but even during the summer months my kids know that they don’t turn on the television, laptop or Kindle until they’ve read at least 15 minutes. It gets their brain going and also guarantees me at least 15 minutes of quiet time in the morning! Hey, I’m human. I am fortunate to be able to have extra time with them right now since I am working primarily from home and I know that this arrangement may not last forever which is why I try to instill the importance and love of reading in them at an early age. Of course we have fun during the summer. We all get to sleep in, we go to the movies, swim at the Y, they go to the local arts summer camp, sports camp and they watch much more television than they do during the school year. I try to provide them with memories that will last for decades, and for me it’s all about balance. I believe the more I keep them feeling connected at home, the less they will look to outside sources.

Again, I’m not judging anyone else’s parenting styles or choices but just trying to bring awareness and information. I may be the only one in my community unaware of the potential of these seemingly harmless apps, but somehow I doubt it. I hope that after reading this, one more parent is aware and checking in on their child’s social media activities and that it may lead to one less kid being abducted from their front step and if so, my work here is done.  Wishing you and your children a fun and safe summer!

Apps Parents Should Know About | Dangerous Apps for Kids – FamilyEducation.com.

 

Expand your village; get support for your young male warrior!

BMDS 2014

BMDS 2014 my son (l) James and his cousin, Hammad.

I grew up with three brothers so I admire and understand men more than many friends of mine who didn’t grow up with brothers.  But as much insight I may have into them, I am not a man and cannot provide my son with all of the tools he needs to thrive in school, in the community and in social media. My son’s father is not as knowledgeable , so I search for outlets and resources for my soon to be teenager so that he can get the support he needs as he begins to navigate through this maze of  hormones, peer pressure and girls!

Thank goodness I came across the Black Male Development Symposium. I believe I read about it on someone’s Facebook post and was intrigued. I visited the website and immediately got excited about all of the different workshops that they offered. For an extremely low price (and some attended for free if they were members of a community-based tutoring or development program), your son is able to attend a full day of workshops AND receive lunch! There were close to 400 young black men in attendance from middle school through college age, and extremely popular concurrent workshops for parents. The unconventional workshop subjects for the young men ranged from learning to play the drum  and navigating rap music lyrics to  managing social media, creating your own black superhero, creating your own comic strip and what to say and what not to say if you were stopped by the police. There were also the typical workshops geared towards college preparation and navigating the college campus as well as peer pressure and bullying in middle school.

I was so impressed with the quality of the information provided as well as the experienced workshop presenters and I am already looking forward to going next year and getting someone to take care of my daughter so that I can attend the parent workshops! My brother facilitated a workshop on Mothers raising boys, and there were other workshops to help with college applications and educating parents on the safety of the social media sites that are popular with our youth. Even if my son’s father were more involved, I would still have urged him to attend this symposium. I try to allow him to make his own decisions, since he is twelve so I showed him the website and let him have the final say (even though I had already signed him up!) He did have a baseball game and Mandarin Chinese class the same day as the Symposium, but he chose to forgo his normal Saturday activities and I supported his decision. And as one friend reminded me, “this happens only once a year.”

The organizers have posted a few pictures and videos from this year’s Symposium and plan to post more so I would visit their website  www.blackmaledevelopment.com or their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/BlackMaleDevelopment to get an idea of the quantity and quality of information available. My son is still talking about it.

Hope to see you there next year!